Archive by Author | Computacenter

Helen Croft, CRN Women In Channel Award Nominee 2020

At Computacenter, we have a strong commitment to promoting, encouraging and progressing the careers of women in tech, and are delighted that this year we have 9 amazing nominees in the CRN Women in Channel Awards 2020! To even be nominated is a fantastic achievement for our talented, hard-working and passionate group of nominees and we would like to send a huge congratulations to all of them.

We are going to be highlighting their individual achievements and journeys to show just how well-deserved these nominations are. The next blog in this series is written by Helen Croft, Workplace Solution Specialist, who reflects on her rewarding career with Computacenter so far.


For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Helen Croft, a Workplace Solution Specialist at Computacenter. 

I joined the Computacenter team back in 2012, following a 10-year career at Bank of America where I was lucky enough to work across several roles, both at individual contributor and leadership levels. During this time I was given the opportunity to work with some phenomenal people, developing their skills and shaping their careers, as well as my own.

Supporting others has always been incredibly important to me, and the pride I felt in my early career years in seeing others develop and progress – while still developing myself – will stay with me forever.  

My Computacenter career so far

I started my time at Computacenter as an Inside Sales Manager back in January 2012, leading two regional internal sales teams who were providing daily support to customers globally.

The team were truly a pleasure to lead; focused, determined, and with absolute drive to strive forwards and deliver exceptional service to our customers. For 4 consecutive years the team progressed, strengthening and growing as a team both in terms of performance and indeed as a group of people genuinely stronger by being a collective. 

One of my proudest moments, in 2015, was when the team were recognised as Inside Sales Team of the Year for their 2014 performance. A fundamental moment for the team and an incredible moment at our annual Sales Kick Off. 

On stage at the Computacenter Group Kick Off event in 2015

In 2016 I took the opportunity myself to join our customer facing sales force, moving into the workplace specialism that I’m still working in today, supporting our customers with workplace services and solutions.   

Moving into the sales team presented a different dynamic; moving towards a unique contributor role, and allowing me to personally explore my true potential within sales. This is an opportunity I have relished, enjoying the customer facing interaction, virtual team orchestration, whilst still working with teams of people to deliver customer outcomes. 

Working through the Coronavirus crisis

2020 has been an interesting year to date. COVID19 has of course impacted a number of plans, but the relationships I have with customers has allowed me to continue progressing our various sales opportunities. I’ve also been incredibly proud to mentor a number of newer sales people into the Computacenter team, and am honored to be nominated in the CRN Women in Channel Awards.

This is incredibly humbling as a sales person, and I am so unbelievably proud to represent the sales team for Computacenter at the CRN awards; it’s also something I hope will help to inspire my two little ladies, Katie and Chloe.   

Nita Voralia, CRN Women In Channel Award Nominee 2020

At Computacenter, we have a strong commitment to promoting, encouraging and progressing the careers of women in tech, and are delighted that this year we have 9 amazing nominees in the CRN Women in Channel Awards 2020! To even be nominated is a fantastic achievement for our talented, hard-working and passionate group of nominees and we would like to send a huge congratulations to all of them.

We are going to be highlighting their individual achievements and journeys to show just how well-deserved these nominations are. The next blog in this series is written by Nita Voralia, Principal Consultant for Workplace and Collaboration, who reflects on her nomination and the work she’s done that has lead her here.


Nita Voralia, a Principal Consultant within Computacenter‘s UK Consultancy division, has been nominated for an award at this year’s CRN Women In Channel Awards in the Unsung Hero Category. Being the only female consultant within the Workplace Collaboration Presales and Architecture Team, she is a huge advocate for women within the sector: “Women in IT should be celebrated,” she says. “I feel that women too have a huge contribution to make.”

In her current role, she both designs and delivers solutions for our based on their individual business requirements. She also takes on presales activities, assisting our solution specialists with putting together costings and proposals for new opportunities. Amazingly, she’s been with Computacenter for over 25 years.

“The roles I have been in during my time here have been both technically focused and challenging, and the solutions and feedback I have received over the years both from customers and colleagues alike has definitely contributed to my CRN Women In Channel Award nomination.”

This isn’t her first award recognition though, having received a silver award for an assignment that was delivered outside of the UK and more recently, earning a nomination for the Computacenter High Performance achievement award.

“I don’t seek the limelight for any work that I do, I just feel that everything should be delivered to the best of my capability; whether that is for a customer or assisting a colleague.” I strongly feel that the work should always be of a high standard.

When she found out about her nomination for the CRN Women In Channel Awards 2020, she was very surprised, and never expected to be nominated! “I feel I’m representing the UK Consultancy practice. I am deeply humbled, honoured and immensely proud to have been nominated.”

Outside of work, Nita helps look after a family member who has Asperger’s syndrome; something that has it’s challenging moments for her. This hasn’t stopped her though, and she still puts her heart and soul into her work. “It helps me overcome a lot of things. In fact, it’s made me more resilient than ever!”

Sharing My Story: Maxi Lawrence, CRN Women In Channel Award Nominee 2020

At Computacenter, we have a strong commitment to promoting, encouraging and progressing the careers of women in tech, and are delighted that this year we have 9 amazing nominees in the CRN Women in Channel Awards 2020! To even be nominated is a fantastic achievement for our talented, hard-working and passionate group of nominees and we would like to send a huge congratulations to all of them.

We are going to be highlighting their individual achievements and journeys to show just how well-deserved these nominations are. The first blog in this series is written by Maxi Lawrence, International Programme Manager, who wanted to share a life-changing experience that she’s recently been through.


Whilst being at home during lockdown, I wanted to use this opportunity to tell you my very personal and positive story; a story of unexpected events, mental strength & fear and fundamental gratitude.

For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Maxi Lawrence, 38 years old, grew up in Germany but live in the UK, married and mother of two strong minded little ladies. I am a Programme Manager and have been with Computacenter for 8 years now.  

Maxi Lawrence CRN Women In Channel Award 2020 Nominee

I am hoping I can not only raise awareness, especially in current times, but more importantly offer my support and help to anyone who is going through similar experiences or needs someone to support them.

My story began with a proactive check-up with no symptoms, triggered by a tragic story of my sisters’ friend who was very unexpectedly diagnosed with a football sized tumour aged 42 in her bowel, and ended up being the most challenging, testing, humbling and lucky experience of my life so far.

What the consultant found was a surprise and concern to us all as a family: a very large polyp in my lower bowel. He took some biopsies, sent me immediately for an MRI and CT scan and referred me to a specialist team of experts.

The verdict was the polyp needed removing as soon as possible as well as a need for further checks. After a successful removal and weeks of waiting, I received a message to meet the consultant in person, immediately knowing there was more to this.  

Thankfully, the majority was good news, however there was a small section of cancerous cells which had started to grow in the polyp. The safety margin was small, and the team could only give me 96% assurance that nothing had started to spread. The solution was major surgery. They had to remove 30cm of my bowel.

“Life can be short, so go for what you want to achieve, don’t be scared to take risks and make tough decisions.”

Maxi Lawrence, Computacenter uk

After asking the team what I could do in preparation for my op, I was advised to be as fit as possible. I increased my already active lifestyle with more running, regular Pilates and super healthy eating, all maximising my physical and mental strength and stamina.

I felt as strong and good as I could have done on the day of the operation itself and was ready for what laid ahead – 4-5 hours in surgery.

One very refreshing and positive moment I vividly remember was the two young female surgeons who came to take me through the risks, possible complications & consent form. Being an advocate of female talent in any profession or industry, I loved that two of my team of three surgeons were ladies. They were not only super friendly, positive and upbeat on a Wednesday 7am shift, they also looked incredible. Their behaviour and appearance really made a difference to my slightly sombre mood.

What helped to get me through?

Now 5 months post op, I am delighted to say my operation and post-op recovery could not have gone any better. The consultant surgeon and his team asked if I could be known as their ‘case of the year’ and said it was text book. They have not seen many cases where the recovery has gone this seamlessly.

Women In Channel Awards 2020

I believe many factors contributed positively to my case, firstly the excellent treatment, care and non-disputable support I received from all the medical staff, my family, friends and my team at work. From flowers to post-op visits, they genuinely cared and still do.

I have felt throughout the whole process that I am very much taken seriously, my treatment was managed with urgency and care. The love and support from my husband, family and friends goes beyond all of that and I learnt there is no shame to ask for help, emotional support or whatever you need to look after yourself.

Secondly, my mental and physical strength and overall very positive outlook on life played a key role. At no point did I let my worries or fear overpower my long-term outlook on the very happy life I have and will continue to have. I am excited by what the future holds, both personally and in my career, with an added perspective which I wouldn’t have without this experience.

I have learnt and grown tremendouslythroughout this time. My inquisitive nature and preventative mindset led me to go for the check-up with zero symptoms, otherwise I would have had to wait until I am 65 years old for standard screening. There is no way I would have made it that long without far more advanced stages of the illness.

At times it has been very hard. The not knowing, waiting for results and treatments has been the hardest. Thanks to my naturally positive mindset and self-motivation, I managed to apply several practical things in my day to day life to keep my focus on the positive side of my story. Let’s just say my home office space had more colourful post-it notes than you can imagine.

Computacenter’s Growing Together Programme, promoting and encouraging women in the workplace

Women In Tech Careers

I thank the Growing Together programme for very real and helpful conversations which greatly emphasised my natural behaviour and way of thinking during such testing times.

I am smiling as I tell you this – I genuinely believe many techniques that the programme covers have such a positive impact on anyone, whether the growth mindset or self-fulfilling prophecy, even working on my personal brand just before my story began, resonated with me many times since.

What lessons have I learnt?

Life can be short, so go for what you want to achieve, don’t be scared to take risks and make tough decisions. Be open to accept support or guidance and be kind and understanding about everyone’s personal story.

Whatreally matters when you are at your most vulnerable in a hospital bed, unable to move? What behaviours in a person make all the difference in how you feel and respond to them?

I did reflect on our Computacenter values and behaviours during this time; we strive to be perfect for our customers and I was very much was able to draw a parallel to my situation in recovery.

A thank you to the NHS staff who looked after me  

I was overwhelmed by the reassurance and trust I felt from the credibilityand total confidence all the staff demonstrated. They are experts in their profession, very credible and with huge amount of experience, passion and genuine care.

It made me feel safe, valued and in the best hands possible.

Also, how straight talking and honest they engaged with me. From the first conversation with one of the consultants, to the frequent checks from the nurses on the ward. They told me the truth, honestly yet kindly. They articulated the medical jargon in a way where I could understand every word and took their time to facilitate a two-way conversation.

Finally, the kindness everyone showed towards me was humbling. I have never felt more vulnerable, yet safe, respected and truly taken care off. Their passion for looking after patients and making them better was outstanding and so underrated. Gruelling shifts, modest salaries and less than state of the art facilities don’t dampen the hard work and quality of care I experienced.

It seems very appropriate to share my very positive and lucky story with the NHS right now and to shine a good light on the amazing work they do despite limited resources. In fact, I have written to the CEO and Board of Directors of the NHS trust where I was treated to pay my thanks but equally ask for recognition to all those individuals who looked after me so well.

The journey continues…

As much as I have a further follow-up check-ups, I am super happy, relieved and a little bit proud of the journey I have been on so far. Over and above all I feel extremely lucky. I have learnt a lot about this illness and how for example additional genetic factors can bring your screening age down: please go and get checked if you have any family history. Your GP will listen and offer referrals if needed.

Why did I want to share my story with you? Well, I want to be a positive example to those of you who may also be affected by this or any illness (which so often goes unnoticed for a long time), to not feel alone.

Support is available and on a personal note I am very happy to offer my support to anyone. Being brave is hard sometimes and it is ok to ask for help. It’s a rollercoaster of emotions and dealing with it on your own is even harder.

Be curious and develop a preventative mindset, the earlier it can be caught the more straightforward and successful the treatment and care.

Furthermore, my perspective on life, work and wellbeing has changed somewhat. I have been lucky to have had a balanced lifestyle for years, but more than ever before I realise stress is not good for us – our mind or body – so I urge you all to limit stress and learn to manage it.

Be happy, smile and laugh every day and enjoy the things you do, see the positive in any challenge. It’s good for us. Look after your body, be active and conscious of what you eat and drink. You don’t have to be a saint but be mindful. It won’t just make you feel better, but also help your body fight whatever it needs to one day.

I also want to show it’s ok to talk about these very common illnesses like cancer, they affect 1 of 2 of us in our lifetime. Awareness and education are vital in the successful treatment of cancers.

I am super happy and lucky to be smiling right now, but I would have also told you my story if the outcome would have been less positive. If any of you have questions for me or have similar things going on in your life, please don’t be shy and contact me if I can help in any way.

I recently read a quote by ‘Anais Nin’ which really resonated with me during testing times:

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage”

I will leave you with that and wish you all the health and happiness during these challenging times.

Mental Health: Why Talking and Listening is So Important

This is a blog by Senior Lead Consultant Kevin Sandberg for Mental Health Awareness Week 2020, taking place May 18th – May 24th. In a time where looking after our mental health is more important than ever, Computacenter are proud to be supporting this initiative and spreading the message that #KindnessMatters.


I’ve almost been working for Computacenter’s TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence for five years. In reality, it should be closer to 7.

Back in 2013, I took a dream trip. I was celebrating my 33rd birthday and I found myself sitting in a pool in Orlando, Florida. Beer in one hand, floating on an inflatable. I was relaxing before going out for a meal with my wife and parents-in-law at the Hard Rock Café. It was everything I could ask for in a holiday, but I was sad.

Hiding the symptoms

This wasn’t the typical birthday blues. I felt down. If I couldn’t be happy in this scenario when could I be? Later that month, I opened up to my wife about it.  At first, she was upset as she hadn’t realised anything was wrong. That wasn’t her fault though; I’d been very good at hiding it.

I realised that I was feeling isolated and started looking for a new job.  My reasoning was that maybe I would be better off in an office-based role with more day to day interaction with other people.

I didn’t feel good enough to do my job.  I didn’t feel up to it and I felt like I was going to be caught out at any minute.  Every day was like treading water.  I was exhausted and I felt like an imposter.

Later that year, I was approached by a former colleague who wanted me to join her team.  I knew a couple of people who worked at her company already, we had all worked together at the NHS.

I thought it would sort everything out. But of course, it didn’t.

New challenge, same me

After an initial bout of feeling good about myself, I quickly reverted to how I was when I was working at home for the TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence.  I was up and down – more down, though, if I’m being honest.

It was great being with my former colleagues again and I loved managing the team I had. I will always be proud of what they achieved but I wasn’t enjoying my new job.

I missed working with ServiceNow and I felt restricted in what I was doing. I couldn’t seem to achieve what I wanted to.

Coupled with the imposter feeling that I still carried with me, I now felt frustrated that I couldn’t easily do for my team what I could have done if I had different tools.

When life gives you a Volvo

When I took the role there was a possibility the new company would be implementing ServiceNow.  They actually went with another vendor and all of a sudden, I felt like someone had swapped the keys to a Ferrari and given me keys to a second hand Volvo; functional, but lacking.

After a particularly ranty social media post on my part, a former TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence colleague reached out and said to me, ‘You know Kev, we would love to have you back.’

I thought about it long and hard.

I knew quite soon into the new job that this wasn’t the quick fix I had hoped it would be in terms of my general mood. Logically, coming back to the TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence was the best choice for my career.

I would make the working from home work. 

I missed that ‘family feeling’ that I had lost when moving to a larger organisation and felt less involved.

It was also nice to feel wanted. I was in the middle of a major project and had to work a 3 month notice period.

So, even though the then TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence MD asked if I could shorten my notice period as they were keen to get me back, it was important to me that I didn’t let down my new team or my colleague who had offered me the opportunity.

Time for honesty: I suffer from mental health issues

So here goes, full disclosure – I have now realised that I have struggled with mental health issues for years and probably long before I even joined TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence in 2013.

I have good days, I have bad days. I can have good weeks and I can have bad weeks.

Lately, I have learnt how to manage it better. It’s still hard to talk about. It’s hard to convey what I am feeling as I don’t fully understand it myself, but I deal with it better than I used to. Sometimes. Some days it takes all the effort I can muster to get out of bed and face the day.

My biggest issue at first was that I didn’t know why I felt this way. I had a good job, a good career, lovely colleagues, great friends, great family and a gorgeous loving wife who I adore. I know I had a life a lot of people would give their right arm for, but I still felt really low and unbelievably sad at times.  

I told a former TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence colleague about my issues and she couldn’t have been more understanding. Eventually, I opened up to more of my colleagues, including my current line manager.

Getting mental health support from my employer

A couple of years ago, I referred myself to NHS Talking Therapy sessions. I was lucky and got an appointment quite quickly. I began to have a weekly 30 minute session, before being referred and having 60 minute sessions each week.

The TU ServiceNow Centre of Excellence have been fantastic, giving me the time off to go and have these sessions in work time.

I couldn’t have gone otherwise, and although I tried not to let it affect my work, I could come out of those sessions on a Friday physically and emotionally drained. I had to sit in the car for a good 10 minutes after one session before I was even up to driving away.

I learned a lot about myself. I also had an event in my life happen at this time which wasn’t nice and that didn’t help, but the support and understanding from people did. I tried anti-depressants to see if they would help. 

The side-effects didn’t outweigh the benefits and eventually, I made the decision to come off them after trying a number of different types. I am aware people have found medication to be a massive help but I have found talking to be the best therapy, and now most of the people I am close to are aware of the struggles I have had.

I call them my ‘fluffy’ periods.

Reaching out and overcoming a reluctance to talk

I understand the reluctance to talk about mental health. I was brought up in the North East of England in a working-class area where you don’t show weakness. Especially the men. It’s a sign that you’re not tough enough.

You definitely don’t talk about it even though that’s the worst thing you could do. And this is what I had been doing for years.

I guess if there is a message in this blog, is that if you can relate to anything that I’ve said and want to talk about it. Reach out.

Reach out to somebody you are comfortable talking to about it. Some people would rather talk to someone they don’t know that well, others want to talk to someone they are close to.

Mental health: An ongoing journey

I am not going to sit here and say I am 100% better now. I have finished my therapy sessions, and I deal with things better. I don’t bottle things up anymore. I’ve learned to reach out if I’m struggling and for me, that’s major progress in itself.

I still feel like I am an imposter at times, that I’m going to get found out at any moment. I’m rubbish at receiving praise and I can tend to focus on the negative. I worry about things I can’t control, and some days I do want to hide away – but I am aware of it now – and I try to manage it and deal with it as best I can.

I went back to Florida with my wife last year, I was in the exact same pool that I had been back in 2013 with a beer and I can honestly say, it was two of the happiest weeks of my life.

If you are struggling please don’t suffer in silence. Please do reach out to someone you feel comfortable with, and if someone reaches out to you, you don’t need to have all the answers – just listen.

You’ll be doing more good than you’ll ever know.

For more information on Mental Health Awareness Week and for support regarding mental health issues, visit the Mental Health Foundation website.

Are you ready for the app attack? How a Zero Trust approach can help prevent security breaches.

In this blog, we look at how taking a Zero Trust approach to developing and provisioning apps can help to prevent security breaches.

Simon Minton Graphic

Guest blog from Simon Minton, Global Cyber Security Advisor at Cisco

The security threat of using apps 

Sharing meeting notes. Processing customer transactions. Logging expenses. Signing contracts. More and more business processes are getting the app treatment. And that means more and more data is being exposed to potential security threats.

How businesses are using the cloud

To ensure apps deliver on stakeholders’ agility and efficiency expectations, organisations are increasingly using the cloud to provision functionality to users both in the workplace and beyond. Apps aren’t just being provisioned via the cloud; they are being developed in the cloud too – and that introduces another layer of complexity and risk.

Cloud-native development enables organisations to build and update apps quickly. But the speed at which apps evolve can result in security being overlooked – especially as organisations increasingly bring application development back in-house due to its strategic and competitive importance.

security threat when using apps

Join the DevSecOps revolution

The need to balance security with agility has given rise to a new operating model in the app development world. DevSecOps isn’t just about adopting new processes and tools; it’s about adopting a new mindset in which everyone in the app lifecycle is responsible for security – whether they are a developer, a business stakeholder or a user.

What is DevSecOps?

DevSecOps shifts security from a bolt-on activity late in the process of application development, when much of the architecture has already been defined, to a fundamental part of the design, build and continuous delivery.

In order for DevSecOps principles to take root in an organisation, developers need to be encouraged to take ownership of security, much like they are incentivised to develop metrics around application availability and performance.

using devsecops in organisations

Reducing the impact of data breaches when using apps 

Most data breaches occur from two interlinking scenarios; an exploitation of either the application itself and/or exploitation of the infrastructure hosting the application. Several recent high profile breaches occurred because of a misconfiguration of the supporting cloud infrastructure. The shared security model adopted by all cloud providers puts the onus on its customers to ensure that cloud services are properly configured.

Ensuring developers and IT security teams work together to proactively remediate misconfigurations in an application or infrastructure can help to reduce the impact from an incident or breach. Data analytics will be increasingly important for both teams when pinpointing application and cloud misconfigurations as well as malicious activity.

Monitoring solutions that leverage machine learning and behavioural modelling can provide visibility of activity not only on the network but also within the development environment and across cloud resources – which can act as an early warning of a potential security breach on an app or within the broader ecosystem.

For example, Cisco Stealthwatch collects and analyses network and cloud telemetry and correlates threat behaviours seen locally within the enterprise with those seen globally to detect anomalies that might be malicious.

To trust or not to trust?

Advanced threat detection solutions can also help to identify policy violations and misconfigured cloud assets that could compromise the future security of an app. But visibility into potential app vulnerabilities needs to go one step further.

With internal and external developers increasingly using internet-based open source elements, such as software libraries, to accelerate time-to-market, apps have become a patchwork of unseen – and often unknown – components. All of which could introduce unexpected risks and dependencies.

Around 80% of an enterprise application is created using open source software libraries downloaded from the internet. Organisations often have very limited understanding of the risks inherent in these libraries or lack the policies needed to remediate known vulnerabilities.

developing apps with zero trust approach

Adopting a Zero Trust approach to app development 

By adopting a Zero Trust approach (where everything must be validated before it can be trusted) to app development, organisations will be able to identify potential security flaws much earlier. This will not only save time and money but also avoid reputational damage.

A Zero Trust approach can also be extended beyond the development stage to the entire lifecycle of the app. Users and devices accessing apps also need to be regularly validated to ensure they are not trying to launch an attack or steal data.

By getting smarter about how they provision and develop apps from the cloud, organisations will be able to protect thousands of employees and customers and provide a richer and safer app experience.

Reuse, recycle, repeat: maximising the value of existing IT assets reduces cost and complexity

Alex_Dodd_v2-02

Whether it’s plastic containers or software licences, we all need to find ways to make the most of the resources we already have.

A new business requirement shouldn’t automatically trigger a new IT investment. This is particularly true within the networking and security arena where costs and complexity increase with every new purchase.

Instead of constantly expanding the security management portfolio, organisations need to start thinking about rationalising and integrating it. According to Cisco, 82% of companies want an integrated security portfolio but very few are achieving it.

Computacenter and Cisco are working together to help change this. As more IT providers move to an evergreen world with rolling releases and bundled packages, it’s getting harder for CIOs and their teams to stay up to date. As a result, features are not used, integrations are not leveraged, and opportunities are not exploited.

Making the switch

Let’s take an example. The Cisco Digital Network Architecture (DNA) subscription provides organisations with a new way of purchasing Cisco Catalyst 9K switches, which form the foundation of the modern intent-based network. But there’s a lot more to the software subscription than just the switches. And these added extras can make all the difference to the efficacy of security and networking operations in a digital age.

As well as providing organisation with access to software-driven rather than hardware-centric switches, the premier subscription also includes tools for managing security policies, detecting security threats, automating processes, configuring networks and generating actionable insights.

It’s hardly surprising then that the Catalyst 9K switches have been one of the fastest-selling new products in Cisco’s history: more than 1,100 customers signed up in the first quarter of availability. Eventually, it will become the standard platform for intent-based networking.

Although organisations have been quick to onboard the switches, the supporting software is still being under-utilised. As a result, CIOs often unnecessarily invest in additional point solutions or continue to use legacy tools that are no longer fit for purpose. They will also be missing out on the latest threat intelligence; the Catalyst 9K premier subscription enables CIOs to leverage the full power of Cisco Talos, which helps to protects people, data, and infrastructure assets.

Unlocking greater value

Computacenter has access to 10 Customer Success Managers – many of whom are Cisco Certified Internetwork Experts – who help organisations unlock the full potential of their technology investments.

We work with CIOs and their teams to drive greater value and enable business success. We share knowledge. We pinpoint existing resources that could be leveraged more effectively. We organise demonstrations and proof of concepts. And we flag potential new investments and integrations.

The shift to evergreen solutions and software subscriptions involves operational, cultural and financial change. Adapting to this new landscape while also delivering digital initiatives is a big ask for already stretched IT teams. But the quicker organisations can adapt, the quicker they can leverage the benefits.

Instead of fulfilling new requirements with new purchases, organisations will become accustomed to checking their existing IT entitlements and assets first. This will not only save money but also prevent the IT landscape from becoming even more cluttered. Maximising what we have today makes for a better tomorrow.

Alex_Dodd_v2-01

#Celebration, #Leadership, #Culture, #Partnership, #CCGKO2019

Iain Mobberley 2 2019Iain Mobberley, a new member of the Computacenter family, reflects back on the past seven months he has been with the company.

So this will be my first blog since joining Computacenter UK to drive our Public Cloud go-to-market in July 2018. What a seven months that has been.

I have just returned from our Group Kick Off which was in Berlin. Anyone that has experienced this either at Computacenter or at other business will understand just how exhausting a few days that can be. This was both a celebration of the company’s performance during FY18 and a look forward to the financial year that we have just started.

This was also about recognition of outstanding performances from team members and business units across 2018. The anticipation of the individuals with regards their individual recognition is somewhat unprecedented. To all that received recognition, I congratulate you. It should of course not go unmentioned that this is almost singularly focussed at the ‘front end ‘of our business. The leadership, the sellers, the marketeers, the partner managers, the technologists and the partners. There is a vast staff within the business that of course ‘makes it all happen’. My focus here though is the part of the business I work in, the part I have very quickly grown to love.

Why?  Well that is a very simple answer; there is great leadership, a fantastic culture which works in partnership internally and externally whether it be with our customers or our suppliers.

GKO Speaker Quotes_People-matter-but-so-do-bears

This has led me to think back to when I was looking for a new role back in 2018. Almost a year ago I was starting to think about what I wanted to do next. There is a huge amount of choice. I took time to identify what was important to me. I was looking for brand in the market, great people, culture and a sense of strong leadership. Oh, and scale! Well, I can confirm all of that is present in Computacenter and more.

Now, I believe that two of the hardest things to get right within a business are culture and leadership. Lots of businesses talk about guiding principles, they often talk about culture, often leaders state their aims but in reality, culture and leadership come from the top. This is exemplified by Mike Norris, Computacenter’s Group CEO. It cascades very quickly through a seasoned group leadership team to a set of country managers that reflect this, embrace it, and provide a huge amount of energy to the business and its employees. One of my original conversations at interview with the UK & Ireland MD, Neil Hall (@NeilHall75), was about culture, fit and leadership. I do not think in the history of my employment I have often witnessed these principles being exhibited by so many. Not just Mike, Neil or others, but by every individual within the organisation. It is quite staggering. It is not that every individual is a leader per se, but every single person reflects a fantastic set of values within the business and reflects them in everything that they do.

There are too many highlights to call out from the last couple of days, but I thought it worth identifying a few; three to be precise.

The first was during the UK&I Country session where we were joined by new colleagues from CC America (more later). It was quite brilliant, to see Lizee Butler for her first time take to the ‘big stage’, in front of a large audience and then to talk with so much passion about people, equality, respect and to open our eyes to always be fair and considerate in everything we do was just amazing.

The second was the story that Kevin James (@K22KJJ) our Group Commercial Officer told on the second day about our partnership with Dell Technologies. Wow! The story was described in the very traditional Computacenter way. However, the compelling thing that clearly came through was leadership and partnership. A joint desire to make a success of something which at the very start looked to be built on slightly rocky foundations. The determination of a team of people to achieve great heights was clear. Our customers now benefit hugely from this strong partnership and long may that continue.

The last was from our Group CEO. The essence of the organisation encapsulates his passion, determination and ability to celebrate when appropriate and steer and lead when needed. The way he commanded respect during the formal sessions and celebrated through the team in the celebration sessions was something to behold.

So lastly, I said I would mention @ComputacenterUS . This part of our business is relatively new. Here are a group of individuals that seem like-minded, passionate and seemingly have embraced everything that is Computacenter. It is astonishing that parts of this business have only been with us since the last quarter of FY18 following the acquisition of FusionStorm. It was hugely interesting to see how the business as a whole has welcomed the new employees to the business but for me the hand of friendship extended by the UK team to help accelerate the partnership and culture seems to be a key to success.

So why write this short blog post and why at this time? The answer is simple really; the decision to join a business can be a daunting prospect, at any level. The questions asked are often: am I a good fit? Is the business a good fit for me? Can I be successful? Well, after seven months I find that Computacenter is everything it claims to be and more. If you are considering a change in employment and important values to you are #celebration #leadership #culture and #partnership then look no further than Computacenter.

Iain Mobberley

Iain is Director for Sales Development, Platform & Hybrid IT at Computacenter UK.

Follow him on Twitter @iain_mobbs or on LinkedIn

World Youth Skills Day: The Importance of Apprentices

Every year, WorldSkills International and The United Nations recognise the 15th of July as World Youth Skills Day (WYSD). Designed to raise awareness on the importance of technical, vocational education, and training, WYSD works towards reducing unemployment and underemployment among youths across the globe.

Ahead of WYSD 2017, we spoke to Martin Pickering, Apprentice Program Manager at Computacenter, and current apprentice Zach Kirk-Gray, 1st Line Support Analyst, about the importance of promoting vocational training, and the benefits to businesses and apprentices alike.

Why should companies invest in technical and vocational education?

For businesses, vocational education is a way to invest in the company culture from the offset. “With apprentices, it really gives us the opportunity to grow grass-roots, technical staff, using the Computacenter brand. This not only gives young people a foot in the door, but at the same time allows companies to fill the gaps that they are finding in their operations” says Martin.

“Some legacy technologies are slowly becoming difficult to employ against, such as mainframes launched in the 70’s and 80’s. The 40 years of service that these technologies have are now bringing the initial starters of that generation towards the end of their careers, and businesses need to realise the value of bringing young blood back into their organisation.

“Not only this, but the youth of today are digital natives, and are also at a stage in their lives when they are really tuned into learning and are extremely flexible with their talents. It’s here that we can start to use the younger generation to really get stuck in and learn about new technologies, such as cloud adoption, and use them as the next generation in an area that can often be very expensive to train staff in, and difficult for older members of staff to be trained on.”

Zach agrees that learning on the job is one of the best things about his apprenticeship: “It’s great to learn with the technologies. Vocational training is important to me because you really have a hands-on experience all the time, and get a lot of face-time with experts in those fields.

“At college, I was only really studying theory, which I felt wasn’t going to help me later in my life, and I found it difficult to learn just looking at books. Going for a practical apprenticeship has been absolutely brilliant.”

Why is it important to offer this type of training to today’s youth?

“Apprenticeship programs are not just about delivering a group of young adults to a team and getting them to do low skilled work,” continues Martin. “This for me is about creating opportunity.”

“I class the apprenticeship as a golden ticket. At Computacenter, we heavily invest the time of our technology experts into developing our analyst apprentices technically, but we also look at soft skills to develop them in the business world. This is an extremely important part of offering training to today’s youth, as many come straight out of college or school without any experience of working in a formal business environment. Even those who leave university with a degree are still under-experienced in the real-world applications of their skills.

“So, not only is vocational training important for their area of expertise, but also to develop their skills outside of technical delivery so that they are transferrable to any role they might hold in the future.

“My hope is that we create the opportunity for them to look back in years to come and see that Computacenter helped them achieve their goals.

How are apprentices valuable to Computacenter?

Martin can’t help but sing their praises: “Apprentices are fantastic and come with a great attitude towards learning. We spend the first three months of the program training them, and they are able to take in all the information like sponges and can retain more than mature analysts that have been in the business world for years – it’s really amazing. Following this, they can then deliver and fill any gaps in the business with attrition at a lower cost.

“When speaking to customers, talking about investing in apprentices is always good news. My hopes are that more businesses realise the value of apprentices, and that more young people become aware of the benefits of vocational education themselves. Perhaps one day one of our apprentices will become the mentors of new programs to come.”

Finally, Zach agrees with promoting apprenticeships to young people, and why they should start considering this educational path: “Being an apprentice gives you the opportunities in life and trains you up to progress through the company, with hands-on training and mentorship. If I was to give any advice to young people deciding which path to take, I’d tell them to definitely go for an apprenticeship.

“I know people that have gone to university, but when they come out the other side they feel like they don’t have the practical knowledge or business acumen to really go out and get that foot in the door. With an apprenticeship, you’re already on your way.”

TECHUK Annual Dinner Competition 2017

Are you a UK tech start-up? Win a place at TechUK’s Annual Dinner & connect with tech industry movers & shakers!

Computacenter and Dell-EMC are sponsoring this year’s TechUK’s Annual Dinner, which will take place on the evening of Wednesday 19th July 2017.

Senior figures from across the UK tech industry, including government and civil services, will gather to network and celebrate the achievements of our industry. Attendees will hear thought-provoking speeches from the likes of Rt Hon Karen Bradley MP, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, and Laura Kuenssberg, Political Editor, BBC, before enjoying an open discussion over a three-course meal.

Leading tech executives across the industry were in attendance last year, with three quarters of attendees at either Managing Director level, or above. Media attendees from the Daily Telegraph, Bloomberg and Computer Weekly were also out in full force.

Computacenter is offering one lucky UK tech start-up the opportunity to attend this prestigious event, and get in front of some of the UK’s most senior tech leaders.

To win your place at the event, all you have to do is tweet @Computacenter, using the hashtag #techUKAD17 describing your UK tech start-up in four words, beginning with T, E, C and H.

The winner will be chosen at random.

The competition is open from Monday 26th June 2017 – Friday 7th July 2017, so get your thinking caps on before it’s too late.

Please see below for the full Terms & Conditions.

…/

 

Terms and conditions

  1. The promoter is: Computacenter plc whose registered office is at Computacenter House, Blackfriars Rd, London SE1 8HL.
  2. The competition is open to residents of the United Kingdom that are employed by a UK based technology start-up company, except employees of Computacenter plc and their close relatives, and anyone otherwise connected with the organisation or judging of the competition.
  3. There is no entry fee and no purchase necessary to enter this competition.
  4. By entering this competition, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions.
  5. Only one entry will be accepted per person. Multiple entries from the same person will be disqualified.
  6. Closing date for entry will be 7th July 2017. After this date no further entries to the competition will be permitted or accepted.
  7. No responsibility can be accepted for entries not received for whatever reason.
  8. The rules of the competition and how to enter are as follows:

Tweet @Computacenter, using the hashtag #techUKAD17, describing your UK tech start-up in four words, beginning with T, E, C and H

  1. The promoter reserves the right to cancel or amend the competition and these terms and conditions without notice in the event of a catastrophe outside of its control, or any actual or anticipated breach of any applicable law or regulation or any other event outside of the promoter’s control. Any changes to the competition will be notified to entrants as soon as possible by the promoter.
  2. The promoter is not responsible for inaccurate prize details supplied to any entrant by any third party connected with this competition.
  3. The prize is as follows: One ticket for the techUK 2017 annual dinner
  4. The prize is as stated and no cash or other alternatives will be offered. The prizes are not transferable.
  5. Winners will be chosen by random.
  6. The winner will be notified by DM on Twitter within 7 days of the closing date. If the winner cannot be contacted or does not claim the prize within 7 days of notification, we reserve the right to withdraw the prize from the winner and pick a replacement winner.
  7. The promoter will notify the winner when and where the prize can be collected/is delivered.
  8. The promoter’s decision in respect of all matters to do with the competition will be final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  9. By entering this competition, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions.
  10. The competition and these terms and conditions will be governed by English law and any disputes will be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England.
  11. The winner agrees to the use of his/her name and image in any publicity material, as well as their entry. Any personal data relating to the winner or any other entrants will be used solely in accordance with current UK data protection legislation and will not be disclosed to a third party without the entrant’s prior consent.
  12. Entry into the competition will be deemed as acceptance of these terms and conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Nelson – My hiring story

How did you find Computacenter Hungary?

I found Computacenter Hungary from social media advertising and also at the same time via a recruitment agency. I started work here in January this year.

When was your interview, and how did it go?

I had two rounds of interview, and the first one was  a Telepresence inteview with my line manager, who is in the United Kingdome. The interview was thorough and I gained a good impression about the company, and the department. My second round interview was with the group Finance Director, who came here to conduct personal interviews and I seem to remember the interview was long and in some depth, but a great conversation and helped me develop a more complete picture of the company and the role. I think the job offer then come quite soon after – in fact it was just before Christmas, so great timing in fact!

What is your opininon about the recruitment process? Would you recommend anything to improve?

Thinking about the first round, I was rejected first for the first role I have applied for, the Head of GSD, and the second one was the Head of Shared Services. I gained a positive insight to Computacenter from the first interview that prompted me to persist when the second role came along. I was happy with the recruitment process and I was introduced to the Recruitment Manager at a pre-Christmas event to talk briefly about the roles on offer. As a candidate, I felt the feedback was good and its always helpful to hear feedback whether the application is successful or not which the company did well.

How did you manage to fit in? And how do you feel yourself at Computacenter now?

I think the culture of the company is a empowering and delegating culture, and this is an environment where I work well. I think the people are very friendly, which is helped me to get estabilished.  And that helps a lot.

What do you like in your current position? What are your challanges?

I think there are many opportunities for the function to develop and improve, and I think I can help to achieve that. There is a very capable and enthusiastic team, who are great to work with and an inspiration. I think the challange  of developing this SSC is very interesting to work with.

What are the differences between your previous and current workplace?

I was leading an SSC before as well in Hungary. Computacenter Hungary is more recently estabilished, which gives a lot of opportunity to shape it and to make the organisation meet stakeholder expectations and grow and develop as we deliver operational results and drive business enablement. It is a fast growing company with many career opportunities, meaning there is no better time like the present to join the team at Computacenter!