Living the New Normal learning the “Next Normal”

It’s has been just over a month since our family, social, business and societal worlds changed to an unrecognisable degree and in a manner that may never return to its previous state. This isn’t the time to describe or discuss the broader implications of the outbreak, but it is the right forum to highlight the role of Information technology and the impact on everything we previously knew plus the greatly increased importance of IT in the “new normal”

There were no instant answers for the questions posed to both society and business when news of the crisis broke.  Business disaster planning and continuity systems and processes previously effective in testing were initial challenged based on a new area of concern of an unexpected kind. Businesses stalling on mass and societies in turmoil was not an option but prompt action from corporates, government and society as a whole, working in a quickly amassed concert stabilised proceedings and signposted “the new normal”.

The societal and business road to full recovery is set to be a long one. However, one thing is certain, information technology has not only proved its worth to date, it continues to be a shining light through this crisis

Observations to date have highlight a number of waves.

  • The first wave was for both families and organisations to ensure people remained calm and safe. It was more about human well-being, increasing levels of understanding and taking steps to protect people in the midst of unprecedented change. With cashless monetary ideals increasing, pervasive financial services organisations underpinned by IT platforms continued to function and deliver payments. Supplementary payments for income and the stability of financial systems helped instil confidence. Continuation of communication via any means necessary was imperative with the global IT networks delivering well under the strain of increased demand for home media, voice, instant messenger, voice and video engagement.
  • The second wave was critical to success and drove the corporate agenda to ensure end user, client devices were available to employees at home in the shortest possible time frame. This delivered a layer of “known” by allowing work related activities to continue but from a different location – HOME. Local Wi-Fi network connectivity, performance, reliability underpinned the success of this wave with the broad consensus corporate networking and security teams plus carrier WANs, fared well at the start of a previously unthinkable event. Many lessons were learned from a device deployment and user on-boarding perspective, with knowledge continuing to evolve that may drive new architectures for user access and security in the future.
  • The third wave that is easy to call the “collaboration wave” was the overnight acceptance of digital, visual collaboration tools as the new conversational engagement normal. It has surprised many the speed and validation across the board of video conferencing as a digital face-to-face engagement mode on par with human face to face or person to person face-to-face. This has been helped greatly by the vastly improved local broadband and Wi-FI network connectivity available in many homes (speaking about the UK) previously used for home media and social activities but now ideally positioned for “home working” connectivity.
  • The fourth wave was to continue and where possible, increase the flow of validated information for all, available in any format where the population may choose to consume it. Daily TV briefings (at least in the UK), mobile devices, social media platforms, broad-line media outlets on the internet and paper based newsprint have continued to circulate up to the moment updates to communicate and increase understanding. Technology has helped to create and transport the continued stream of information and news to help everyone remain informed thus helping to reduce fear, deliver social and health guidance and to ensure the population remains safe.
  • The fifth wave, potentially the current state and but definitely not the final wave, has been the increased importance of intentionally securing user and business outcomes for now and next. This statement doesn’t infer security was not inherent in the previous four waves but with the sheer speed required to shift people, organisations and social systems to a remote working at times a minimum layer of security was implemented to accelerate time to user benefit. Now is the time to evolve user and organisational information security to learn from the current normal and rethink the security for the new age.

Information Technology stood up to the plate and delivered at a time when humanity required a positive intervention of the magnitude far greater than anything previously considered. End to end IT platforms from user & client devices, through Wi-Fi & LANs, WANs, satellite networks¸ cloud computing to deliver on demand processing of workloads and storage for the mass of information created daily continue to deliver “country & world” impacting services every minute of every day. And we can’t forget information security is the mandatory thread running through every IT activity and outcome ensuring everything “remains “intentionally secure”.

There have been a number of IT solutions that have flipped the script, real game changing products and services that have delivered so well that they have reset any previous perceptions of value. The importance and resonance of client and end user devices, whether smartphones, tablets, laptops, internet enabled TVs cannot be overstated. Video conferencing isn’t only a norm for now, it is set to underpin a fundamental shift from work as an activity based on location to work as an “output” possible anywhere (within reason). The importance of the network as the digital umbilical cord for all cannot be higher with connectivity key to the success of the recent home working initiatives. Cloud platform and application delivery has come of age with organisations capitalising on the speed of access to “as a service” applications with the ability to deliver cloud resource based operational environments in vastly reduced timeframes. This is set to continue and grow.

End user security awareness most notably email hygiene and phishing services are proving their worth daily as the volume of cyber attacks targeted at home working personas spirals upwards. The new wave of cyber-attacks is driving a rethink of cyber breach remediation services in a remote user dominated world. Network visibility and assurance services with the capability to determine state, manage and affect connectivity in remote, WAN and datacenter situations may be next on the operational IT deployment list if the current dynamic working mode is set to continue indefinitely. And lastly UEBA (user entity behavioural analysis) may rise from the ashes as a must have security control set as organisations try to understand security anomalies and user behavioural unknowns across a remote user landscape as early indicators of attack or compromise.

We are in the midst of a state of global and societal flux of the scale few of us ever believed we would experience in our lifetimes. The loss of life is truly heart-breaking and sadly is set to continue. Information Technology has shifted from a passive role to an assertively active agent of positive change at a time of unprecedented crisis for humanity. With a lifetime career in IT to date it has been highly rewarding to see this amazing technology industry play such an important role at a time of global need with business, humanitarian and societal impacts at time that are truly humbling to witness.

Until next time.

Be safe, stay safe.

Colin W

Business Line CTO Networking and Security – Computacenter UK

Twitter: @colinwccuk

Computacenter Blogs (note the views within are my own and cannot be deemed a Computacenter view or perspective):  https://computacenterblogs.com/author/colinwilliamscc/

 

 

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About Colin Williams

Colin is Computacenter's Practice Leader for Networking, Visual Collaboration & Security @colinwccuk

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