Archive | June 2018

The Employee and EX

Elements of Employee Experience

Ask anybody what Employee Experience is and you’re likely to get a different perspective nearly every time. Most organisations would probably be able to explain what they expect or want from Employee Experience, improved levels of employee engagement, enthusiasm, identity and involvement. However how do you relate that to what your employees need?

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Employee experience can’t be defined as a single thing or entity. It’s an amalgamation of your employees’ encounters with your organisation over a period of time.  The experience of an employee will differ from day to day. Some days they might have an extended commute to an office for a meeting and have to experience long traffic delays. Other times they will be working from a home office. But it could equally be working on a corporate device that is still running Windows 7 and legacy Office products and be heavily locked down, restricting their ability to work with both customers and colleagues.

Given the diversity of experiences your employees can encounter, you may consider this to be just too difficult to overcome. How can we change this? Whilst the strive to have a perfect experience for all your employees could be a step too far, most organisations can make significant headway to improve its employee satisfaction by considering some of the basic elements that make up its user experience.

It is important to understand the major elements at play and their effect on the employee experience; these are:   Culture, Technology and Workspace.

These elements define how your employees interact and behave within an organisation and impact their overall experience of their workplace. Considering how these elements need to evolve is key to improving the employee experience

Embracing Employee Experience (EX)

Employee Experience is becoming the watchword for organisations seeking to improve their employee engagement. It borrows concepts and approaches from the customer experience mind-set and applies them to its own employees. This approach seeks to improve employee touch points, from attracting talent and on-boarding through to how the employee performs their job and how they get rewarded.

This all makes sense, and if organisations had the ability to start again I’m sure many would incorporate all of the best practices available to get the best employee experience. But most organisations have considerable debt to consider in this area and cannot always justify the call to action to improve all aspects of its employee’s experience. However be warned this is not a get out of jail free card, organisations will ultimately suffer in the long term if employee experience does not evolve.

Achieving a better employee experience starts with “Understanding”. Knowing what your current situation is and what your employees are thinking, gaining insights into how they work is an essential step to improving their experience. Identifying the areas of your business you would like to address, for instance: is your employee retention rate to high? Are your employee satisfaction scores to low?

In order to address EX organisations should consider a three step approach:

  • ENGAGE with your employees and gain real world perspectives and data on how they are operating across the key EX dimensions. What is working for them and what is not? Listen to your employee’s views, gain insights and valued feedback.
  • EMPOWER your employees by involving them in the solutions, apply an employee centric approach to the thinking. What works best for them? What experience would drive the right behaviours? Acknowledge any issues and work together on solutions to address them.
  • ENRICH their experiences and increase their sense of meaning and belonging by working together to evolve the organisations culture, technology and working spaces by acting on the joint ideas and improvement initiatives.

These three steps should allow you to start to bridge the gap between what the actual employee experience is and what it needs to be. Now is the time to start this journey and engage with your employees and work together to empower them to drive the right experiences that will ultimately enrich their working lives.

 

Full STEAM ahead!

Encouraging the youth of today to become the tech leaders of tomorrow

In technology terms, UK businesses have never had it better. The UK tech sector now accounts for 10 percent of GDP and Tech Nation’s 2018 annual report revealed that the UK firmly leads in Europe, attracting £28bn in technology investment since 2011, compared with £11bn in France and £9.3bn in Germany.

Continuing adoption of cloud and virtualisation technologies and increasing interest in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning capabilities demonstrates that business leaders are aware of the increased productivity and profitability that’s on offer. However, even for those embracing the digital revolution, there remains a significant obstacle to realising the full benefits of modern IT infrastructure technologies.

Whilst the IT skills gap is now old news, it’s also not going anywhere fast. The deficit of skilled tech experts across the globe continues to grow and with Brexit looming in the UK, the outlook is even more uncertain. Many organisations are looking at short term solutions, such as de-siloing their IT departments to make expertise more broadly available and even outsourcing infrastructure to managed service providers (MSPs), but this doesn’t address the core issue. There’s still a real need to develop long term solutions to ensure UK businesses and the wider economy remains productive and competitive in the global marketplace in 2019 and beyond.

Mind the gap

In 2016, the UK House of Commons Science and Technology Committee delivered a damning report on the state of the skills gap – calling the situation a crisis and revealing that even down to the level of ICT teachers, there is a critical shortage of qualified candidates. That same report revealed that in the previous year over 90 percent of tech-based businesses struggled to fill vacancies and that the growing digital skills gap was already affecting their commercial activities.

To make matters worse, many of the UK’s digital technology businesses have historically relied upon talent from the wider European Union and the looming Brexit situation is only projected to starve the economy further of qualified IT professionals and engineers. Present estimates from the UK Government indicate that the digital skills gap is currently costing the UK economy £63 billion a year in lost GDP and as we transition towards an increasingly digital world, addressing the digital skills gap will be crucial to growth across every industry sector.

Looking ahead then, there are only two clear paths to sustaining growth and success; providing greater opportunities and incentives to cultivate new STEAM graduates through the UK education system, and creating new jobs for these new workers to excel in.

Establishing a meritechracy

At Computacenter our experience of the increased demand for tech resources, paired with the huge IT skills gap, led us to start an initiative to build our own homegrown talent. We believe that it is our responsibility to help school and university students across multiple subject disciplines to realise their true abilities and to become everything they could be.

In 2007 we established a programme of associate, apprenticeship, and graduate schemes to attract and encourage a diverse range of candidates to become the next generation of engineers and tech leaders, and it has been a resounding success. Since January 2015 alone, Computacenter has employed 142 apprentices, with over half of those in Technology based subjects following structured training and development plans with education and work elements. We also offer young people support through an Industrial Placement Programme, where university students spend 12 months working in a job that may relate to their studies and future career aspirations.

Both of these pathways are essential and we feel this demonstrates the level of our commitment to addressing the skills shortage, specifically within IT whilst providing more opportunities for talented young people. With 14 percent of the UK workforce currently aged 28 or under, and having seen a 67 percent retention rate on our programmes to date, we are confident Computacenter is driving this subject right from the top!

A brighter future

As UK businesses continue to voice their concerns around the growing skills gap, the Government appears to be taking heed of the seriousness of the situation and implementing strategies to attempt to reverse the national skills deficit. However, it’s not enough. We will need the entire industry to collaborate and create a long-term solution to address the skills crisis, with a strong focus on training and creating accessible entry level jobs.

At Computacenter, we believe that it’s necessary for businesses to take a more active role in building and nurturing the talent they need to succeed in the future. Given the increasing demand for ‘job ready’ applicants, programmes such as apprenticeships and industry placements will prove invaluable in attracting and developing skilled workers who will enable both public and private sector organisations to leverage the latest technologies and achieve their full potential.


Chris Price is Director of Public Sector & SI for Computacenter.

Cloud or Multi-cloud: Customers need not just one partner or vendor, but an ecosystem of providers

A little over a month ago we officially opened our new office in Dublin. Along with our UK MD, Neil Hall, we presented the investments we have been making in Computacenter’s portfolio of offerings, and how these can help our Irish customers achieve their goals.

While many of our customers who have a presence in Ireland will already be aware of the Computacenter proposition, many new to Ireland may not. In my presentation, I focussed on a couple of key topics: our relationship and capability around AWS & VMware; and the IP we have developed to help customers accelerate their developments with multiple cloud providers. We subscribe to the school of thought that multi-cloud will continue be the dominant approach towards cloud in the enterprise market, and if that is the case, then we also believe we have some very differentiating IP in our Hybrid Cloud Adoption Framework (HCAF).

Recognition of our investment in HCAF, partnerships and capabilities

I had the opportunity to repeat some of these same messages in Arizona last week, while at VMware’s Partner leadership Summit, where I shared with VMware & their top partners from across EMEA what HCAF is, and why it is important in a market where VMware will be consumed alongside AWS, Azure, GCP, etc. I must have done an OK job, as one of the partners from the Middle East offered to buy the IP! Later the same day, I went on stage to pick up the ‘VMware EMEA Public Cloud Integration’ Award on behalf of Computacenter, recognising the work we have done investing in HCAF and our broader public cloud partnerships and capability. What I find exciting about this recognition is the fact we have not even started to tell the story about the work we have been putting into the infrastructure as code (IaC) and containers space.

When it comes to awards, Computacenter & our hybrid IT & platforms team seem to be on a roll just now receiving some long overdue recognition for the work we have delivered to date. Since the week before the event in Dublin, we have picked up a few notable awards, including:

VMware UK&I Partner of the Year
• DELL EMC EMEA Partner of the year
• DELL EMC Presidents Circle
• VMWare EMEA Public Cloud Integration

Industry recognition really does helps us differentiate when we are speaking to our customers. Receiving accolades from across several vendors helps even more, as what our customers need right now is not one partner or vendor, but an ecosystem of providers who will work together and collaborate on behalf of the customer, and that is what we strive to deliver. Neither cloud nor multi-cloud represents a finishing line, where it all stops once you are there. The evolution rolls on as the market continues to find new ways of creating solutions that bring additional value and efficiencies.

Realising the value and delivering the business case

But with cloud, some things do need to be finished to realise the value and deliver the business case. In a recent customer example at Eversheds, click here to view the video case study, the greatest satisfaction was not the winning of the project, or delivery of their new cloud platform, it was the pictures of the man with the sweeping brush in the empty DC once we had migrated everything to the cloud and handed the keys back to the customer. While this might not seem like an important task, failure to finish the job and empty the datacenter means it’s still an asset on the customer’s books and the business case is not realised. As much as we herald HCAF, our cloud partnerships and awards plus our ability and track record of closing datacenter’s and handing keys back, are both up there as key components in our cloud value proposition.


Want to know more about the journey of bridging private and public cloud? Watch the Carpool tech Talk with me and Nick McAllister from VMware.