Its time to stop waiting for brave new world of IT to happen – “Create IT”.

I have spent nearly 30 years in this frenetic but captivating IT industry. The mainframe presided over an era of computing where machine ruled man – we stood in awe of the immense power but in reality were not truly sure, capable or “ready” to harness it. The mini computer or baby mainframe followed and even with so much potential and an audience with the desire to unlock the magic within, missed the mark with the result a short lived tenure. But all was not lost and the door soon opened to a world of IT in the eighties kick started by IBM and Microsoft that still underpins the mode we embrace today. The personal computer (PC) and eventually the PC networking era signalled a change from intelligent IT systems and intelligent humans interacting in a less than harmonious existence to the computer and human in lock step. For the first time there was no dominant IT system looking down on the subordinate human, but a computer driven by the person for the person – personal computing was born. And with vastly simplified networking between computers and devices the intelligence of PC based IT systems, driven by human creativity delivered real value that was enhanced exponentially by the sharing that occurred amongst IT system users

But why the rambling, chronicle – a common thread throughout those heady and ever changing times was the need for continual learning and the creation of seemingly infinite knowledge. It was hard to academically and intellectually absorb so much unknown, with the emergent IT concepts nothing previously discussed or envisaged. It was that painful effort to know and then by knowing “do” (not always well, but still “do”) that helped to drive IT as an industry to where it is now, fundamental to both social and business outcomes.

However I fear things are starting to change and through this current time window, not all of the change is for the better. The availability of just enough knowledge and insight delivered via the world’s great search engines (invaluable) and the accessibility of “just enough” knowledge in digital form at every juncture may well have resulted in a state of “knowledge” malaise across the IT community. With an ageing population still coupled in many areas to an internal knowledge set from a previous era but with a depth of tacit experience that will be invaluable to future generations and a incoming worker population from the digital era bought up on the stable of “just enough” infinitely available knowledge we have a recipe for confusion (and in some cases failure).

This modern mode of “just enough” knowledge with a lacking human investment in really “knowing” to the level of depth required, may force IT through a period where the struggle for skills reaches a  level more acute than it is today. Let me say at this stage I am not inferring laziness or delinquency on the part of the IT community I am also a part of. But I am worried the profoundly new skills required for the next 3 to 5 to 10 years have been underestimated by many (many are soft and emotional skills) therefore the long run up required to realise them no longer exists.

If you are an IT professional to any degree, ask yourself “do I have the technical understanding and tacit knowledge to remain effective and productive over the next five years?”.  Many will answer “yes” but based on a cursory review of everything their undertake today remaining constant and relevant – however I fear it will not as we may embrace a greater level of IT, process and operational change in the next five years than the previous ten or fifteen.

There has been no better time (how many times have we said this) than now to reskill, “right skill” to lead the IT industry of today into an unknown but potentially lucrative tomorrow. It will require inspirational leadership, a relentless focus on learning and a maniacal desire to turn all of the learning into “new, relevant knowledge”. And that knowledge may be created and unlocked via a healthy amalgam of older experienced heads coupled with younger energised hearts – surely a recipe for long term success. Who knows, maybe this is the secret sauce we have always been looking for?

This brave new world won’t happen if we stand back and watch and wait – it’s time to get involved.

Until next time.

Colin W

Chief Technologist Computacenter UK – Networking, Security.

(Doctoral student Worcester university 2016)

Twitter @colinwccuk

 

 

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About Colin Williams

Colin is Computacenter's Practice Leader for Networking, Visual Collaboration & Security @colinwccuk

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