2016 – Time to act as the stage is set – but tackle the “elephants” first.

Happy New Year and may 2016 be your most successful and effective yet. It’s the time of year where every analyst, strategist and technologist delivers a number of market or technology based predictions for the year. In reality they are educated guesses because no one really knows what will happen, but the activity is essential (and one you should personally undertake) because it ensures you have an outward focus (external focus) that is as fundamental to your business success (or at least viable) as your internal view. And best of all with market predictions, they are not guarantees of change as they are based on all of the indicators, assumptions, dependencies or guesses remaining consistent. Over the coming months I will share three 2016 perspectives for the Security, Networking and Digital collaboration (UC in old school terms) marketplaces. The views are my own but leverage extensive market and customer research most notably based on real world customer dialogue and challenges through 2015.

The Security challenge in 2016 could be the back breaker the industry is currently dreading. There are numerous forces and events that will ensure 2016 requires so much business change (positive change) that the door will be widened to any party focused on attacks and breaching defences.  There are numerous (too many to actually affect or process) security related impacts that any forward thinking enterprise must consider through 2016 – many are documented heavily within industry white papers and vendor solutions updates. However I will concentrate on six, a few common, others not that are currently giving me most food for thought as I work on strategies for 2016.

The relentless rise of the mobile enterprise (Mobility):  Mobility delivers one of the most acute security challenges today. The mobile worker, enterprise, user is no longer a fad or a secondary persona – it is the norm for many enterprises and will ultimately become the norm for all. Driven via the smart device (most commonly a phone) bonded permanently to the hand of many a user and an almost infinite pool of “relevant” applications, the need (not desire) for every digital activity to be available, everywhere, all of the time will deliver a security challenge second to none.

The connectivity issue that previously stalled the mobility drive is somewhat alleviated with fast wireless connectivity available in the home and enterprise and pretty fast connectively (sometimes) outside and on the move. That has moved any business obstacles to launch a mobility drive away from networking and connectivity and pushed it straight into the hands of the security team to ensure where a connection is made it is sure, and where data is accessed it is controlled. Some say it is an impossible task but that is conceding defeat too easily. It is a challenging but not an impossible task and an enterprise serious about affecting security change could start with:

  1. A top down perspective on the attitude towards risk for the enterprise (what really are “business breaking events”)
  2. A rigorous understanding of the regulatory framework that governs the enterprise (compliance)
  3. Comprehensive visibility of data assets within (where are they, what are they, how important are they, do they need to be protected, and to what level)
  4. Full understanding of how can someone get to them (connectivity and access)
  5. A real time, dynamic view of the secure persona or posture of the users.

I have simplified the workflow and challenge greatly (and many other perspectives must be considered and the order could change) but tools, processes, services and systems exist today that will really make a dent in the “secure mobile enterprise” challenge. It’s too easy to blend a “mobile enterprise” persona into existing and potentially legacy approaches to mobilising users and delivering business services – resist the temptation and use the time for change to undertake a “back to basics” information security review. Do nothing or do slowly because only a small group are mobile is a flawed theory – now is the time to act.

The next big thing – IOT:   The Internet of Things (and or the internet of everything) has captured the imagination of analysts and marketers alike. The connected world of “things” sending and receiving data, commonly over IP protocols but others are emerging, opens the door to a 21st century world previously impossible to imagine. Picture the world of connected cites, healthcare devices talking directly to medical professionals, smart homes exchanging data with utility companies – in fact forget the picture those services, solutions and “outcomes” are already here today. And there lies the problem, the IOT use cases are currently very fluid, personalised and often driven by imaginative use of existing and sometimes emerging technology. With IOT implementations and ideas so cutting edge, the challenge of securing the outcome becomes even greater.

At the risk of becoming an innovation “kill joy” only one recommendation exists of real validity, design any IOT / IOE solution with security acting as the core design frame to minimise the unthinkable challenge of a security retro fit to a solution beyond go live. This sounds like a simple and obvious recommendation (obvious yes, simple no) but is often bypassed due to the enthusiasm, complexity and excitement surrounding the implementation or benefit of the “things” solution. It is fundamental to success to challenge all vendors, integrators and consultancies on secure IOT principles as soon as the “drawing board” solution development phase begins. I fear the IOT security challenge with so many current and future unknowns will be one of the ticking time bombs of the greatest impact over the coming years.

It’s too early in the year for extra long blogs (you have barely cleared your Christmas inbox) so part two of this blog will be next week. I hope the richness of the outline above adds colour to your strategy and planning activities through Q1 to allow you to identify security topics that really require top priority focus through 2016. Two more topics next week and before January concludes the complete story will be told.

Until next week

Happy New Year

Colin W

Twitter @colinwccuk

Chief Technologist Computacenter UK, Networking, Security and Digital Collaboration (UC)

Tags: , ,

About Colin Williams

Colin is Computacenter's Practice Leader for Networking, Visual Collaboration & Security @colinwccuk

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s